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Hi

Welcome to Felicity. Have fun finding happy.

Mind Games

Mind Games

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I've had a couple of traumatic events happen to me in the last couple of years, both very different - the break up of a relationship and being caught up in the bombing in Manchester. But in the wake of both of these event I found myself seeking solace in something quite unusual for me, playing computer games. In my normal day to day life I don't usually play games on my phone or computer, I even advocate switching off from digital devices. But something drew me to play during these emotionally unstable times, so I wanted to investigate as to whether this was just something I did or if there's any science behind why I might do this when I'm sad and distressed. 

I guess it's seems quite obvious, I was drawn to playing games on my phone as a way of distracting myself from reality. I just wanted to focus on anything but the unpleasant thoughts racing through my mind. Simple but challenging games on my phone allowed me to will away hours in the first couple of days of those horrible events without really having to think about what had happened to me.

I've since learnt that playing computer games can actually produce an analgesic (pain relieving) response in the brain. The games I opted for were things like The Sims and Pokemon, really not ones likely to get my heart racing, games like this can help reduce the adrenaline response which is heighten following a traumatic or stressful event.

Oxford University conducted a study that found that playing Tetris can help reduce the chance of getting post traumatic stress disorder. The hypothesis was that short behavioural interventions like playing games like Tetris after a trauma would help patients experience fewer intrusive memories. The idea is that since games are visually demanding it could stop intrusive memories from becoming established.


The study was conducted in A&E departments, people being admitted following car accidents were given Tetris to play and a control group was treated as usual without the game. Compared to those who didn't play Tetris the gamers had less intrusive memories of the accident in the week that followed.

So it would seem from my (very limited research) that there could be some real benefit to getting lost in a virtual world when you're feeling anxious or stressed following a traumatic event, speaking from personal experience it certainly helped me.

Optimism

Optimism

Manchester

Manchester